Your comments: 1 March 2017

Here are your comments on topics covered by us. We look forward to hearing your views and opinions on all related articles. Please email us at frontline@csp.org.uk;

World of opportunity

I recently had the privilege of travelling to Australia with a National Institute for Health Research clinical lectureship, (covering clinical and research roles). This was an opportunity to explore the current reality of service provision in my area: the long-term follow-up of patients with a joint replacement.
 
The visit included discussions with physios, orthopaedic surgeons and researchers in Perth, Brisbane and Cairns. Similarities with the UK included the questions that are being asked about care of patients with a joint replacement and the desire of physios and nurses to extend their skills as advanced practitioners. It was interesting to see some of the care offered and to understand the contribution that may or may not be made by advanced practice physios, depending on local healthcare arrangements. This has informed my views on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of arthroplasty surveillance.  
 
For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2lg3FsW
 
  • Lindsay K Smith, Weston General Hospital 

A credit to UEA

It was great to see Marcus Hunt talking about his role with Unilever in the 3 minutes column (page 66, 15 February).  Marcus is one of our University of East Anglia (UEA) MSc graduates and is an inspiration for current students. 
 
His mix of clinical, academic and professional skills has clearly allowed him to open up an exciting and successful career opportunity.
 
It certainly helps further promote the unique contribution that physiotherapy offers to the world of corporate wellness.
 
  • Jon Larner, course director, MSc pre-registration physiotherapy programme, UEA 

Prison parity

Given the recent pay rise for prison officers, will the CSP be pressing for a similar approach to tackle the NHS recruitment and retention problems and thus reduce exorbitant agency bills? 
 
  • Claire Betts

A class act

I read your articles about physios working in gyms and about falls with great interest as I recently set up a multidisciplinary wellness clinic in a converted barn in west Sussex with physio-led Pilates classes. 
 
Our most recent addition is Pilates Barre. I trained as a classical dancer until I was 16 and worked in gyms teaching aerobics through university. After completing a Masters in sports physiotherapy in 1998 I studied Pilates and incorporated that into my practice. 
 
I discovered Barre classes last year and instantly saw how it could benefit a wide variety of people as it incorporates posture/core, balance, strength and functional weight-bearing exercises all with the fun of music. 
 
I teach it for fitness but we are also tailoring classes for those with balance issues and osteoporosis. 
 
I am seeing great results in posture and gluteal strength, and will try to get the local GPs to get involved in referring older people to attend balance barre classes as a preventive measure to reduce falls.
 
  • Trish Formby, senior physiotherapist 

Keep on evolving

My mother, Diane Waitt of Folkestone, Kent, is 82 and will retire from physiotherapy this year.
 
She qualified in 1962 and her career spanned the NHS and the private sector. She set up her own private practice in a hospital that eventually became part of BUPA, and then set up her own independent practice in the late 1980s.  
 
She has always been a CSP member, kept her training up and kept evolving. I know she has a fantastic reputation in Kent as a physio and Soroptomist who focuses on understanding before she treats. 
 
My mother had a fantastic career in physiotherapy and is as fascinated by the subject today as she has ever been.  
 
  • Alan Waitt
 
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