Meet the Games Makers

An estimated 800 CSP members are involved with the London 2012 Games either as volunteer Games Makers, torch bearers or performers in the opening ceremony. Frontline has talked to some of them.

For Tripti Gyan, who runs her own clinic in Nottingham, TG Physiotherapy Care, this is her first international sporting event, and she’ll be a first responder for both the Olympic and the Paralympic Games

Why did you decide to volunteer?
My professional success is an accumulation of many people’s efforts for which I am truly grateful and I hope that my role at the London Games will serve to inspire others to imagine what they can achieve if they weren’t afraid.

How do you feel about being selected?
People from all over the world will be coming to London.

I want them to go back with a feeling that they were treated humanely and with kindness.  I want to make this a wonderful experience that they will remember for a long time.

What messages will the Games give the public about the role of physiotherapists?
Physiotherapists are an integral part of the structured health care team supporting the athletes during the culmination of their entire life’s work.

What do you think the greatest health legacy will be from the Games?
To inspire people from all walks of life to think, train, and act like an Olympic athlete every day of their lives.

Dorothy Toyn  is self-employed and a CSP Council member. She will be driving Olympic participants to venues in London.

Why did you decide to volunteer?
I had been unwell and was not working when I applied, and decided it was an opportunity of a lifetime to do something positive and different, even if it was not physiotherapy.

I was born, as were my children, in the East End of London, and I trained and worked at The Royal London which I loved. It is fabulous to see the whole area regenerating from what it was.

How do you feel about being selected?
Fabulous. I am really looking forward to it.

What messages will the Games give the public about the role of physiotherapists?
We need to ensure the public know about the importance of physiotherapy within sport, during training and competition.  How the profession can assist a person to attain their best, through correct posture, muscle balance and treatment of injuries to optimise healing.

We are a profession that can assist is so many ways and in so many walks of life – sport is just one of those whether you are a professional, amateur or just kicking a ball around in the park with friends.

What do you think the greatest health legacy will be from the Games?
It would be good to see a rise in interest in any form of sport across the population.

I hope there will be more facilities around for everyone  to enjoy, and it includes activities like walking, cycling, swimming – any activity that gets you moving, and not just specific sports.

Jane Ashbrook, an NHS physio at St Helens Hospital, Merseyside, will be a physio at both the beach
and indoor volleyball. She’s previously been to the European youth volleyball championships,
the world youth orienteering championships and the World Youth Games.

Why did you decide to volunteer?
I love the Olympics and am passionate about sport.

I couldn’t let a home Olympics pass me by. I had to think long and hard about volunteering as the time
and financial commitment involved couldn’t be achieved without huge support from friends and family members.

How do you feel about being selected?
Volleyball is a fantastic sport to play and an exciting sport to watch and I feel very lucky to be involved.

The London Olympics is an important stage to improve the profile of volleyball in Britain and increase participation at grass-roots level.

What messages will the Games give the public about the role of physiotherapists?
Hopefully people will see how hard physios work to help people achieve their potential and reach their goals.

What do you think the greatest health legacy will be from the Games?
To get people excited about sport.

Watching athletes compete at a home Olympics will inspire the people of Britain, young and old, to get involved in sport.

Maybe try something new and make the most of the facilities left behind by the London 2012 legacy.

Sam Bourgein (left, with Danny Boyle who directs the Olympic Games opening ceremony) studies MSc rehabilitation science at the University of Brighton. He will dance in the ceremony on 27 July as part of the NHS contingent of performers.

Why did you decide to volunteer?
To be involved with something that I will never again have the chance to do.

I think it’s hugely important, given the state of the country over the last couple of years, to pull together, celebrate and give us as a nation (and the NHS of course) a big ginormous ‘shop windowed’ pat on the back.

How do you feel about being selected?
I was amazed.

Although I regard myself as quite the dancer (so I’ve been told) I never ever imagined to be in a position where I could be showcasing my skills in front of 4.5 billion viewers.

What messages will the Games give the public about the role of physiotherapists?
It’s showcasing the fun-loving and positive nature of physiotherapists as well as all the other professions that are unknowingly under-praised within our communities.

It’s a great opportunity to prove to the world how amazing physiotherapists and the NHS really are.

What do you think the greatest health legacy will be from the Games?
I definitely think the NHS routine will be a positive message that is showcased around the world and is finally something that we, as a nation, can stand together and be proud of.

Read more at: www.csp.org.uk/london2012

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