The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

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QA Standards: glossary

• Accountability – taking responsibility for, and accepting the consequences of, a personal decision or action
• Advocacy – acting on behalf, and in the best interests, of an individual or group of individuals with the intention of having a positive influence on a decision or action affecting that individual or group
• Altruism - a concern for others, with personal actions motivated by a desire to help others above anything else, without considering recognition or reward
• Associate member - An associate member is a support worker who has joined the CSP as a member
• Autonomy – the ability to make decisions and act independently 
• Beneficence – a fundamental ethical concept of ‘doing good’ and ‘avoiding evil’
• Client – a person in receipt of a service; where the term uses ‘individual’ or ‘client’, this should be interpreted to include any other responsible person such as a carer, parent or guardian, as appropriate to circumstances; in the case of animal physiotherapy, the term may be interpreted to mean an animal and its owner/carer
• Code of Professional Values and Behaviour or ‘The Code’ - The Code sets out the CSP's expectations of all members: qualified physiotherapists, associates and students
• Compassion – a human emotion initiated by the experiences or suffering of others and leading to a desire to alleviate their suffering
• Competence –  Competence is the synthesis of knowledge, skills, values, behaviours and attributes that enables members to work safely, effectively and legally within their particular scope of practice at any point in time.
• Conflict of interest – a clash between a professional or public obligation and a personal need or interest
• Consent – The process by which an individual allows something to occur to themselves
• Continuing professional development (CPD) - a wide range of learning activities through which members’ abilities are maintained and developed throughout their career to ensure the capacity to practise safely, effectively and legally within an evolving scope of practice (including, in the case of qualified, practising members, fulfilment of the CPD requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)) formerly Health Professions Council (HPC) 
• CSP – Chartered Society of Physiotherapy
• CSP member – a person who is a member of the CSP in one of the following categories: as a qualified (chartered) physiotherapist, physiotherapy student, or associate (as a physiotherapy support worker)
• CSP membership - open to physiotherapists who hold registration with the Health Professions Council (HCPC) and are therefore eligible to practise physiotherapy in the UK, physiotherapy students, and physiotherapy support workers; physiotherapists who have been eligible for and Care Professions  registration but who have retired, are taking a career break, or who reside/work outside the UK may also be members, as may physiotherapists who practise on animals
• Delegation - the process through which one person allocates work to another person on the basis of deeming that individual competent to undertake that task, with the delegated individual then carrying responsibility for undertaking the delegated task
• Disclosure – An organisation will ask for a disclosure to ensure that necessary legal information for recruitment and placement decisions can be made especially in positions involving children & the vulnerable (ie Protection of Children & Protection of Vulnerable Adults). There are a number of mechanisms through which this is undertaken in the United Kingdom
- England and Wales: The criminal records bureau
- Northern Ireland: Access NI is a Criminal History Disclosure Service within the Department of Justice In Northern Ireland. 
- Scotland : Scotland Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) scheme http://www.disclosurescotland.co.uk/pvg/pvg_index.html
• Dignity – an individual being respected and esteemed
• Duty of care – the responsibility held by members to ensure that their decisions and actions are in the interests of the individuals receiving or affected by physiotherapy services that they deliver
• Empowerment – the process of giving someone power or authority over a decision or action
• Ethics – issues of correct conduct informed by moral principles
• Evidence – different forms of valid and relevant information that are used to underpin decision-making; and action that are often, but not exclusively, the outcome of research activity; evidence may support, refute or identify the need for further enquiry regarding the safety, effectiveness and efficacy of a method of service delivery, a management approach, a treatment or a modality
• Fairness – reasonable behaviour that is motivated by a consideration of the needs of others and the delivery of services equitably
• Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) formerly the Health Professions Council (HPC) - the statutory regulatory body for the allied health professions (AHPs), formed in 2002 (as the successor to the Council for Professions Supplementary to Medicine (CPSM))
• A ‘health record’ - any record which: consists of information relating to the physical or mental health condition of an individual, and has been made by or on behalf of a health professional in connection with the care of that individual.
• Honesty – acting with integrity and adhering to known facts
• Individual – a person receiving a service from a CSP member (as a patient or client, or as the carer of a patient or client), or a person who is affected by a CSP member’s delivery of a service; e.g. deriving from research, education or management activity
• Informed consent – in the UK this is taken as meaning that the patient/ service user has been told of the ‘nature and purpose of the proposed treatment, together with all significant and material risks, benefits and outcomes of the proposed treatment AND has been told of all the alternative and comparative treatments that are available for the condition being treated.’
• Integrity - adherence to moral and ethical principles; having sound moral character; acting with honesty
• Intervention – a term used to include all aspects of service delivery, clinical care and physiotherapy management. 
• Leadership - an act or instance of providing guidance or direction
• Learning and Development –
• Lone working – Individuals who work alone - whether on a regular or permanent  basis  either on a regular basis or for a short period of time each day 
• Member – a member of the CSP
• Medical devices - an instrument, apparatus or other which is intended for use in the diagnosis of disease or treatment or management of conditions. 
• Morals – personal, societal or cultural values or codes of conduct
• Non-discriminatory – treating individuals and groups fairly and without prejudice 
• Non-oppressive – ensuring a position of authority or power is not exercised in arbitrary, unjust ways 
• Organisation - the structure(s) within which a member undertakes his or her physiotherapy activity, within the public, private, independent and third sectors 
• Person-centred practice – Putting the person at the centre of practice describes the behaviour, knowledge and skills required to: demonstrate respect for the individual; provide information and support that enables an individual to make informed choices; involve individuals in shaping the design and delivery of their service 
• Physiotherapy values – a set of values - shared by CSP members - regardless of their occupational role, practice setting, or level of practice. These values inform the behaviour of CSP members, and the knowledge (theoretical and applied) and skills that the physiotherapy workforce uses and develops
• Physiotherapy knowledge - shapes, and is shaped by the profession’s constantly evolving scope of practice. Although an individual’s knowledge base will be shaped by the demands and context of their practice, physiotherapists must demonstrate how their knowledge and understanding relates to physiotherapy and their individual scope of practice. 
• Physiotherapy practice skills – the practical (psycho-motor) skills used by the physiotherapy workforce.   These include manual therapy, electro-physical modalities and other physical approaches.  As with physiotherapy knowledge, an individual's skill-base will evolve according to their experiences and context of practice, but individual’s must demonstrate how their skills relate to physiotherapy and their personal scope of practice
• PREM- Patient reported experience measure
• Professional autonomy – the application of the principle of autonomy whereby a Member makes decisions and acts independently within a professional context and is responsible and accountable for these decisions and actions
• Professional judgment - the ability to form valuable opinions and make good decisions within a professional framework
• Professionalism – defines what is expected of a professional, and what it means to be professional. Broadly, it can be summarised as; A motivation to deliver a service to others, Adherence to a moral and ethical code of practice, Striving for excellence, maintaining an awareness of limitations and scope of practice and A commitment to empowering others (rather than seeking to protect professional knowledge and skills)
• PROMS – Patient reported outcome measures
• Quality Assurance – the process by which services or care are monitored to ensure that mandatory standards are being met
• Record- a physiotherapy record is a health record.  That is any record which: (a) consists of information relating to the physical or mental health or condition of an individual, and (b) has been made by or on behalf of a health professional in connection with the care of that individual. A record can be in paper or electronic format, or a mixture of both, and includes all the information relating to the health status and management of the individual service user. The record may contain information about the current episode of care only, or may be a compilation of every episode of care for that individual in a given timeframe. There are various types of records in practice; for example, summary/full record; shared record; uni-professional record; and patient-held record. Depending on the needs of the patient, and the care setting(s) involved, the record may be maintained by the CSP member or a group of different professionals across the care pathway.
• Referral – When one health professional asks another health professional to take over the care of the service user
• Risk Assessment - a logical process of identifying hazards and putting in place sensible measures to prevent or control them
• Reasoning – the ability to make logical inferences from available information
• Service – the physiotherapy service delivered to the service user used to mean clinica care or 
• Service user – an individual or individuals in receipt of a service from a member to include patients, clients, carers and others.
• Scope of practice – the scope of practice of physiotherapy is defined as any activity undertaken by an individual physiotherapist that may be situated within the four pillars of physiotherapy practice where the individual is educated, trained and competent to perform that activity
• Support worker - Anyone in a direct or indirect clinical support role.  They are not subject to professional registration
• Valid consent – an individual being in receipt of sufficient knowledge of all relevant facts and factors to agree to, or refuse, a particular course of action
• Value – the importance or worth of something (an outcome, intervention or service) for an individual
• Values – ideals that individuals or a profession find morally compelling

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