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Feasibility, safety and outcomes of playing Kinect Adventures!™ for people with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study

Abstract

Objectives

To assess the feasibility, safety and outcomes of playing Microsoft Kinect Adventures™ for people with Parkinson's disease in order to guide the design of a randomised clinical trial.

Design

Single-group, blinded trial.

Setting

Rehabilitation Center of São Camilo University, Brazil.

Participants

Seven patients (six males, one female) with Parkinson's disease (Hoehn and Yahr Stages 2 and 3).

Interventions

Fourteen 60-minute sessions, three times per week, playing four games of Kinect Adventures!

Main outcome measures

The feasibility and safety outcomes were patients’ game performance and adverse events, respectively. The clinical outcomes were the 6-minute walk test, Balance Evaluation System Test, Dynamic Gait Index and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39).

Results

Patients’ scores for the four games showed improvement. The mean [standard deviation (SD)] scores in the first and last sessions of the Space Pop game were 151 (36) and 198 (29), respectively [mean (SD) difference 47 (7), 95% confidence interval 15 to 79]. There were no adverse events. Improvements were also seen in the 6-minute walk test, Balance Evaluation System Test, Dynamic Gait Index and PDQ-39 following training.

Conclusion

Kinect-based training was safe and feasible for people with Parkinson's disease (Hoehn and Yahr Stages 2 and 3). Patients improved their scores for all four games. No serious adverse events occurred during training with Kinect Adventures!, which promoted improvement in activities (balance and gait), body functions (cardiopulmonary aptitude) and participation (quality of life).

Cite this article

Feasibility, safety and outcomes of playing Kinect Adventures!™ for people with Parkinson's disease: a pilot study; Physiotherapy - June 2014 (Vol. 100, Issue 2, Pages 162-168, DOI: 10.1016/j.physio.2013.10.003)

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